Progress Report #78

I started Chapter 31 with the feeling that it was too long. But I couldn’t see in advance where to break it up. Today I found the point. It’s more than a little surprising that I didn’t see it. A murder and a bad election, all at once. It’s strange how the news got delivered to me. It was as if the universe was waving this big flag, trying to get my attention. “Over here! Over here!” I apologize for speaking in code. Someday it should all make sense.

Tomorrow I’ll start another pass through 31—clean it up some—and then it’s on to Chapter 32: a murder, a bad election, and being discovered asleep in my hiding place.

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6 Responses to “Progress Report #78”

  1. tz Says:

    I can’t wait to have chapter 31 in my hands… I assure you I will be wishing it was longer.

  2. Sarah Says:

    I assume that Bad election = Tricky Dick? If so, we’re looking at 1969.

    1969 wasn’t ALL bad; Pete Townshend formed Thunderclap Newman then. 🙂

    • markbittner Says:

      No, it was Ray Gun.

    • Sarah Says:

      I’m baffled by his enduring popularity among voters whose social-economic interests he harmed. His folksy grandfatherly demeanor angers me.

    • markbittner Says:

      Nearly all those who worked with Reagan eventually made some remark on how much of a fantasy world he lived in. It’s easier to sell a fantasy if you really believe in it, and people bought what he was selling. What we’re seeing happen in the country today is the fantasy that Reagan sold breaking down under the stress of reality—not that people understand that that’s what’s happening. It’s a trying time. I feel like nothing real can happen until the Reagan bubble completely pops.

    • Sarah Says:

      “What we’re seeing happen in the country today is the fantasy that Reagan sold breaking down under the stress of reality – not that people understand that’s what’s happening.”

      Agreed. I am, as are doubtless millions of other people, also very aware that the bottom 90 percent are feeling the pain and the top ten percent are feeling the benefits of his legacy (or perhaps should I say, the consequences of his administration’s deregulation-fixated policies).

      The power elite will feel little to no pain if or when the bubble pops.

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